How To Grow Strawberries In Iowa
What is the proper way to plant strawberries? – When ready to plant, trim off the older leaves, place the roots of the plants in water for an hour, then plant immediately. Set each plant in the ground so the crown of the plant is even with the soil surface.

  1. The type of strawberry determines plant spacing.
  2. June-bearing strawberries should be planted 18 to 24 inches apart in rows spaced four feet apart.
  3. Runners will develop and root freely to form a matted row about two feet wide.
  4. Everbearing and day-neutral strawberries are typically planted in beds consisting of two or three rows.

Space rows one foot apart. Plants are spaced one foot apart within the rows. A 2-foot-wide path should separate the beds. Any runners that develop on everbearing and day-neutral strawberries should be removed and the plants maintained as large, single plants.

  1. Immediately after planting, water the strawberry plants and apply a starter fertilizer solution to aid establishment.
  2. A starter fertilizer solution can be prepared by dissolving one or two tablespoons of an all-purpose garden fertilizer, such as 10-10-10, in one gallon of water.
  3. Apply one to two cups to each plant.

A starter fertilizer solution can also be prepared using a water soluble fertilizer. Follow label directions when preparing the solution. : Yard and Garden: Planting, Growing and Maintaining Strawberries

When can you plant strawberries outside in Iowa?

Bountiful crops are possible with a little effort. By Richard Jauron Extension Horticulturist Iowa State University Fresh strawberries are an irresistible treat. They taste great on cereal, pancakes, waffles, and ice cream. They also make excellent jams, jellies, and pies.

  1. Strawberries are well suited to home gardens.
  2. They are hardy, easy to grow, and produce a good crop with moderate effort.
  3. Early spring (April to early May) is the best time to plant strawberries in Iowa.
  4. Home gardeners can choose from three types of strawberries.
  5. June-bearers are the most widely planted type of strawberry.

They produce one crop per year, the majority of fruit ripening in June. A second type of strawberry is the everbearing strawberry. Everbearing varieties typically produce June and late summer/early fall crops with little flowering or fruiting in the intervening weeks.

Day-neutral varieties are the third type of strawberry. Day-neutral varieties can flower and fruit throughout the growing season if temperatures are moderate. Flower and fruit production stop during hot weather. Suggested June-bearing strawberry varieties for Iowa include ‘Earliglow,’ ‘Allstar,’ ‘Honeoye,’ ‘Surecrop,’ ‘Redchief,’ ‘Jewel,’ and ‘Kent.’ ‘Ozark Beauty’ and ‘Ogallala’ are good everbearing varieties.

‘Tristar’ and ‘Tribute’ are the best performing day-neutral varieties. When selecting a planting site, choose an area that receives full sun and has a well-drained soil. Planting sites should receive at least 6 hours of direct sunlight per day. Leaf and root diseases are often problems in poorly drained, wet soils.

  • Do not plant in areas that are heavily infested with perennial weeds.
  • Perennial weeds, such as quackgrass, are extremely difficult to control in a strawberry planting.
  • Also, avoid sites where strawberries, tomatoes, potatoes, and peppers have been grown the last two years to prevent possible root disease problems.
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Purchase virus-free strawberry plants from a reputable garden center or mail-order company. Plants from an old planting are often disease infested. If planting must be delayed after purchase, place moist material, such as wood shavings or sphagnum moss, around the roots and place the plants in a plastic bag.

Store the plants in the refrigerator at 32 to 40 degrees F. They can be safely stored in the refrigerator for one to two weeks. Remove the strawberry plants from storage when ready to plant. Trim off the older leaves, place the roots of the plants in water for an hour, then plant immediately. Set each plant in the ground so the crown of the plant is even with the soil surface.

The type of strawberry determines plant spacing. June-bearing strawberries should be planted 18 to 24 inches apart in rows spaced 4 feet apart. Runners will develop and root freely to form a matted row about 2 feet wide. Everbearing and day-neutral strawberries are typically planted in beds consisting of 2 or 3 rows.

  • Rows are spaced 1 foot apart.
  • Plants are spaced 1 foot apart within the rows.
  • A 2-foot-wide path should separate the beds.
  • Any runners that develop on everbearing and day-neutral strawberries should be removed and the plants maintained as large, single plants.
  • Immediately after planting, water the strawberry plants and apply a starter fertilizer solution to aid establishment.

A starter fertilizer solution can be prepared by dissolving 1 or 2 tablespoons of an all-purpose garden fertilizer, such as 10-10-10, in one gallon of water. Apply 1 to 2 cups to each plant. A starter fertilizer solution can also be prepared using a water soluble fertilizer.

  1. Follow label directions when preparing the solution.
  2. During the first growing season all the blossoms should be removed from June-bearing strawberries.
  3. Remove all blossoms on everbearing and day-neutral strawberries until early July.
  4. Any flowers which bloom after this period may be allowed to develop into fruit.

Flower removal aids plant establishment. Strawberries are an excellent crop for the home garden. When properly planted and given good care, one strawberry plant can yield 1 to 1-1/2 quarts of fruit. Contacts : Richard Jauron, Horticulture, (515) 294-1871, [email protected]

Can strawberries be grown in Iowa?

Iowans encouraged to visit a strawberry grower or shop at a farmers market to enjoy these fresh, delicious treats – DES MOINES – Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig reported today that many strawberry growers across the state are now reaching the peak season for many varieties of this delicious crop.

Naig encouraged Iowans to visit a local strawberry grower or shop for strawberries at one of Iowa’s many farmers markets. Strawberries go from bloom to fruit in about 30 days and are best eaten within a few days of being picked. Strawberry harvest season only lasts about 4 weeks in Iowa and harvest times vary across the state.

Most strawberry growers in the state offer pre-picked and u-pick options at their farms. “Locally grown, fresh strawberries are a delicious and versatile treat that can be eaten alone or enjoyed as an addition to many recipes. They’re a great crop to kick-off the growing season of purchasing and consuming fresh, Iowa grown fruits and vegetables,” Naig said.

  1. As a favorite fruit among many Iowans, strawberries are low in calories and fat-free.
  2. One cup of unsweetened strawberries only has 55 calories.
  3. Strawberries are also a good source of vitamin C, folic acid, potassium, and fiber.
  4. A family trip to the strawberry patch is a great way to support a local farmer and make memories that will last a lifetime.
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If visiting a strawberry patch, be sure to call or check the website for their harvest information. Many growers also offer other fruits and vegetables for sale to consumers. You can find strawberry growers by visiting our Fruit and Vegetable Farms Directory at https://www.idalsdata.org/fmnp/index.cfm or on the Iowa Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association “farm search” page at http://www.ifvga.org/en/about_us/farm_search/,

What are the best strawberries to plant in Iowa?

Which strawberry varieties perform well in Iowa? – Suggested June-bearing strawberry cultivars for Iowa include: ‘Earliglow,’ ‘Allstar,’ ‘Honeoye,’ ‘Surecrop,’ ‘Redchief,’ ‘Jewel’ and ‘Kent.’ ‘Fort Laramie’ and ‘Ogallala’ are good everbearing cultivars. ‘Tribute,’ ‘Seascape’ and ‘Albion’ are the best performing day-neutral cultivars.

Is Iowa known for strawberries?

World’s Largest Strawberry, Strawberry Point, Iowa

  • Strawberry Point,
  • Strawberry Point, Iowa is probably the technical champion of the World’s Largest Strawberry title (if we ignore water towers and buildings painted red with seeds).

The 15-ft. tall painted sculpture is on a post in front of City Hall. It’s fiberglass, designed by a local ad agency, and was dedicated in the late 1960s. Also see: | Create Your Own Bizarre Road Trips!, Roadside America app for iPhone, iPad. On-route maps, 1,000s of photos, special research targets! Roadside Presidents app for iPhone, iPad. POTUS landmarks, oddities.

  • , Avoca, Iowa
  • , Des Moines, Iowa
  • , Colfax, Iowa
  • , Pisgah, Iowa
  • , Decorah, Iowa
  1. , Los Angeles, California (Jul 3-9, 2023)
  • , Koshkonong, Missouri
  • , Larwill, Indiana
  • , Santa Ynez, California
  • , Evansville, Indiana
  • , Stamford, Vermont

: World’s Largest Strawberry, Strawberry Point, Iowa

Can you grow fruit in Iowa?

Strawberries, red raspberries, currants, and gooseberries will grow throughout Iowa if reasonably good sites and soils are selected. Black raspberries and blackberries are less winter hardy, and should only be considered for southern and central Iowa.

What fruit is native to Iowa?

Papaw Description & Background – The pawpaw ( Asimina triloba ) is the largest edible tree fruit native to the United States and grows wild in 25 states, including Iowa. In Iowa, they are found in the wild in the southwest and southeast part of the state, usually as an understory tree.

  1. On the east side of Iowa, they are found as far north as Jackson and Dubuque County.
  2. In full sun, pawpaw trees grow to about 15′ high and 8′ in width.
  3. In shaded areas, they may be taller, but narrower in spread.
  4. Pawpaws are relatively free of pests and deer do not eat them, although they can cause rubbing damage.
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There is a debate on whether the tree is actually native to Iowa or was introduced by Native Americans and/or railroad workers. Perhaps it is more than just a coincidence that many of the populations are found within 100 yards of an existing or former railroad right away. How To Grow Strawberries In Iowa A cluster of four pawpaw fruit from trial.

What season is best to plant strawberries?

Plant – The best time of the year for planting strawberries is in the spring. The easiest way to grow strawberries is to plant strong, vigorous young plants. Cover the roots with soil, but don’t plant too deeply. The central growing bud must stay above the soil so sunlight can reach it and cause it to sprout.

You can grow strawberries from seeds, but plants won’t bear fruit until the year after planting. First, stash the seeds in the freezer for 4 to 6 weeks to jumpstart germination. When planting, use Miracle-Gro® Seed Starting Potting Mix and barely cover seeds because they need some light to germinate, a process that will take about a month.

Be sure to water well after planting.

What are the best strawberries for Zone 10?

Easy Strawberry Varieties To Grow – There are many different varieties of strawberries, and the time it takes for them to bear fruit can vary depending on a variety of factors including climate, soil conditions, and growing practices. Here are some popular strawberry varieties and their approximate time to fruiting:

  • Earliglow: This variety typically produces fruit in 2-3 weeks after blooming.
  • Honeoye: This variety typically produces fruit in 4-5 weeks after blooming.
  • Chandler: This variety typically produces fruit in 4-5 weeks after blooming.
  • Jewel: This variety typically produces fruit in 5-6 weeks after blooming.
  • Allstar: This variety typically produces fruit in 5-6 weeks after blooming.
  • Seascape: This variety typically produces fruit in 5-6 weeks after blooming.
  • Albion: This variety typically produces fruit in 5-6 weeks after blooming.
  • Ozark Beauty: This variety typically produces fruit in 6-7 weeks after blooming.
  • Quinault: This variety typically produces fruit in 6-7 weeks after blooming.
  • Tribute: This variety typically produces fruit in 6-7 weeks after blooming.

Please note that these are general guidelines and the exact time to fruiting can vary based on a number of factors. If you live in a colder climate, it’s best to select strawberries that fruit relatively quickly after blooming. Additional Resource: These Are The Best Companion Plants For Strawberries

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